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Hope for the best (and be prepared for the worst).

What does homeowners insurance cover? A homeowners insurance policy provides the policyholder with both property and liability coverage. Property coverage includes damage to your dwelling, personal property or other structures on your property that are sustained from covered causes of loss such as fire, theft or vandalism. The liability section, sometimes called property casualty insurance, provides coverage for claims brought against you for bodily injury or property damage you cause to others for which you are legally liable. Additional coverage can be purchased for valuables or collectibles, including antiques and jewelry.

Renters Insurance

If you rent your home or apartment, your landlord is responsible for insuring the building, but your personal property is your responsibility. Renters insurance protects you from loss in case of fire, theft or other perils.

Condominium Insurance

If you own a condominium, your condo association may pay for insurance on the building, but you will need to purchase condominium insurance to protect your personal property and any improvements that you make to your unit.

Flood Insurance

For many homeowners, deciding whether or not to purchase flood insurance can be difficult to determine. The government assists with this by identifying areas prone to flooding, also known as flood zones, to assess flood risk. If you are in an area covered by the National Flood Insurance Program, we can help you acquire the flood insurance coverage you need.

 



Insurance products are offered through Univest Insurance, Inc. and are obligations of the issuing insurance companies, are not obligations or deposits of or guaranteed by any bank and are not insured by the FDIC or any other agency of the United States. Insurance products are not a condition to any bank loan, product or service. Univest Insurance, Inc. is a licensed subsidiary of Univest Corporation of Pennsylvania.

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